1 Graphic 50 Words

Graphics and Writings

Category: writing

Stone Deaf

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Like a
stone deaf
unbridled mule
unable to hear
the desperate
plea.

Poem by Tom Simard
Sketch by John Spiers

Sometimes short poems are packed with big ideas. This is one of those poems.

To read more of Tom’s creative work, please visit Tom’s WordPress blog. By the way, this poem is from a published collection of his poems titled “Watercolors.” To learn more, please visit “Watercolors”.

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Water and Silt

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Ever the dreamer
unable to see
as his carefully laid plans
came to naught,
and he found himself
in a century-old house
where cats had
crawled about
the matriarch of the clan
rocking in her chair
with simplistic ease.

In a land of poverty
where nothing took to the soil
but weeds.

When winter came
you moved about
to keep warm
as if there were no walls
surrounding you.

You turned on
the creaky bathtub
faucet,
and after an
interminable delay,
there came a
burst
like a bronchial fit,
an equal measure
of water and silt.

Poem by Tom Simard
Sketch by John Spiers

While reading this poem with its intriguing title, my mind went immediately to the claw-foot bathtub in my own old house. Arriving at the surprise ending to Tom’s poem, I very easily related to all of the often unexpected repair jobs that have been needed.

One of the challenges to this sketch was to somehow show a feeling of anticipation and action without giving away the poem’s clever ending.

I chose an angled “snapshot” composition to convey action. This is what you would see if you were bending over to turn the faucet handle, much like how Tom’s poem switches from “he” to “you” as a way of involving the reader in the action.

There is a broad “he” view emphasized by the bathtub tray and how it has been drawn, but also a close up “you” view caused by showing just part of the fixture where the water (and silt) will pour.

To read more of Tom’s creative work, please visit Tom’s WordPress blog.

The Crab Apple Tree

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The tree’s branches
stretched out
in all directions:
north to the land of forests;
south to the fertile earth;
east to the river valley;
west to the great wide open prairie.

Scattered all about
the ground
were small
crab apples,
some of which
without
a hole
where a worm
had burrowed
might be eaten.

Poem by Tom Simard
Sketch by John Spiers

If you have followed along recently, you know that Tom Simard, another WordPress blogger, and I have been working on a collaborative experiment involving his poems and my sketch.

When he sent a group of poems to me recently, one of them immediately brought to mind this sketch done many years ago of a crab apple tree. The words from the poem “The tree’s branches stretched out in all directions” perfectly described what I had wanted to convey in my sketch of a crab apple tree. Even his description of crab apples that had fallen to the ground fit with these mostly bare branches.

To read more of Tom’s creative work, please visit Tom’s WordPress blog.